Most of us are in worship ministry because we love music and worship and have achieved some degree of ability in the arts. In church music ministry, we wrestle with the conflicting objectives of presenting our very best musical offering while accepting the efforts of those with less than perfect musical abilities. Cultivating excellence in music is a worthy goal, but it must not take precedence over the people who make the music.

Unfortunately, the same climate that cultivates musical excellence is also a hothouse for competitiveness, pride and temperamental issues. This dilemma was addressed at a music co

If you have been given a worship ministry leadership role, it is your role not just to do, but to equip. It is your job to release, stir up, disrupt, call out, challenge and awaken the musical talent in others. Richard L. Evans instructs, “People need people who believe in them, trust them, and expect much of them.”

nference. “When you get to heaven, you’re not going to be able to wave an Artist’s Exemption Card at God. He is not going to be impressed when you say, ‘I know that I have offended a few people, but You’ll have to excuse me. I’m a musician and you know how temperamental we can be.’”

 

“And he gave some, apostles; and some, prophets; and some, evangelists; and some, pastors and teachers; For the perfecting of the saints, for the work of the ministry, for the edifying of the body of Christ:” (Ephesians 4:11-12). Another translation says it this way, “So Christ himself gave…to equip his people for works of service, so that the body of Christ may be built up until we all reach unity in the faith…” We must never lose sight of people and their needs. The church can use us to bring encouragement to people AND cultivate excellence.

Lindel M. Anderson, MME, DWS

Indiana Bible College

Dean of Worship Studies

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